The Red Couch: Fourth Quarter Books

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How did we get to the point of announcing our last quarter of 2015 book selections already? Granted, we’re still in the middle of our Third Quarter selections. But still. I’m amazed by how quickly the last seven (eight, if you count this month) books have gone.

I hope you’ve enjoyed our summer/fall fiction selections. October will bring us back in non-fiction territory: Native American History/Church Life, memoir, and poetry.

In October, we’ll read One Church, Many Tribes by Richard Twiss. If you’re not already familiar with Richard Twiss, it’s time to acquaint yourself. Twiss was a member of the Sicangu Lakota Oyate and co-founder and president of Wiconi International, an organization providing education, encouragement, and support to Native American families, up until his untimely death in 2013. In One Church, Many Tribes, Twiss examines the complicated and often broken relationship between the church and Native/indigenous people, while also giving us a vision of what could be. A vision in which the First Nations people play a vital and vibrant role in how we understand God, creation, and community.

In November, we’ll read Take This Bread: A Radical Conversion by Sara Miles. Miles was not a likely candidate for darkening a church door but she somehow found herself there and the act of eating the bread and drinking the cup transformed her. That first communion changed her and eventually led to her starting a food pantry at that same church, which ultimately changed the food pantry landscape in San Francisco. Miles writes about communion, faith, and poverty unlike anyone else. Hers is an unconventional life and faith and we would do well to pay attention.

In December, we’ll read A Widening Light: Poems of the Incarnation edited by Lucy Shaw. This poetry collection will help us prepare our hearts for Advent. Instead of a discussion, the Red Couch team will offer a reflection on their favorite poems and we’ll invite you to do the same.

Don’t forget: we’re sharing an interview with Once Was Lost author Sara Zarr on Wednesday August 26. Our Once Was Lost discussion will happen Sunday, Aug 30 at 6pm PST/8pm CDT/9pm EST in our Facebook group.

September’s book is The Alchemist by Paulo Coehlo.

What’s the best book you’ve recently read?

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Leigh Kramer
Leigh Kramer is on a quest; she’s living life on purpose. Her to-do list might look something like this: leave life in the Midwest for Nashville, Tennessee, followed by San Francisco, quit steady job as a social worker to chase her dreams of writing, suck the marrow out of life’s in-between places and revel in the now at every turn. Leigh shares this journey through words of transparency, heart, and just a dash of pluck at LeighKramer.com and on Twitter at @hopefulleigh.
Leigh Kramer

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