5 Stories of Women Who Love

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The SheLoves community is made up of women from all walks of life, all over the world.  Over the years we’ve learned there are few things as powerful as when we share our own stories. Boldly telling our own truth creates space for other women to stand in theirs. Here are five stories of women who love.

I am a Lady Preacher, Called and Qualified

Abby Norman is one of those women who makes you feel like anything is possible. A recent graduate of the Candler School of Theology Abby pastors a small church in the American south, a place where you don’t see a lot of women in the pulpit. (Is there anywhere where you do see a lot of them? If so, I want to go there.) She is standing in her calling and by so doing makes room for us all.

“GOD calls me qualified, so what else could I possibly need?” — Abby Norman

Sisters in Mental Illness: Nicole Interviews Shaley

It’s usually Shaley who interviews brave and courageous women who are willing to talk about their journey with mental illness. This time the tables are turned. Mental illness is not easy to talk about but oh how we need to talk about it.

“This is the thing. I can be my full self here.” – Shaley Hoogendoorn

In Honor of Black History Month

We’ve never been ones to shy away from hard topics and earlier this year in honour of Black History month, Chervelle took on the task of writing about race and how she interacts with her own skin. It is an intimate and powerful look into what it means to be a black woman in Canada in 2019.

“It’s easy to choose to conform in order to fit in. I am often the only black person in my circles. But more and more, I am seeking out my community of people.” — Chervelle Camille  

The Sacrament of Ordinary Work

It is incredibly easy to label our own work as unimportant especially when it’s behind the scenes, or it happens at home. Women are often conditioned not to seek the spotlight or the corner office but it’s a mistake to dismiss ourselves so readily.

“All work is honourable, whether other people hold it in high regard or not.” – Claire Colvin

How I Made Peace With My Boobs in a Brothel

In this beautiful photostory Tina talks about what it’s like to grow up female especially in the years when suddenly her body didn’t belong entirely to her. Other people gawked at it and touched it without permission. She writes about her experiences with breastfeeding  and what she learned in a brothel in Thailand that changed the way she saw her own body forever.

“My boobs first became problematic in 1992.” – Tina Francis Mutungu

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